Two Jeers for Risch and Crapo

U.S. Sens. Jim Risch and Mike Crapo joined Idaho’s Tea Party darling U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador to advocate for another government shutdown. These GOP standard-bearers didn’t mind slashing $24 billion our of America’s economy and hurting our global economic and political standing. Mark them down as the GOP no-plan, no-solution, wrecking crew.

Their excuses for voting no on recent bi-partisan debt deal are simply red meat rally cries to their radical base. As the Post Register noted:

Who are Risch and Crapo representing these days? Everyone in Idaho? Or just those who vote in the GOP primary?”

The Lewiston Tribune was equally unimpressed:

And don’t forget, the Republican position – locking in spending at the current levels – means dropping the Payment in Lieu of Taxes program worth about $1.5 million to Idaho County. It inflicts more pain at the Idaho National Laboratory at Idaho Falls and Mountain Home Air Force Base. And for anyone working in Idaho ranching, logging or mining, it generates more delays in obtaining federal permits.”

The only way Idaho will have responsible leadership is to elect responsible leaders. Risch and Labrador are both up for re-election. Rep. Shirley Ringo of Moscow is the antidote for Labrador’s extremism. An opponent for Risch has not announced … but we are optimistic that we will have a honest, hard working candidate who puts Idaho families and businesses ahead of special interests and who will fall victim Potomac Fever.

 

From the Lewiston Tribune:

JEERS … to Idaho Republican Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch. To steal a line from former Vice President Spiro Agnew (who himself borrowed it from speechwriter William Safire), they have become “nattering nabobs of negativism” who act like a pair of bricks plopped onto the “no” button.

Case in point: Wednesday’s budget vote. Here’s a modest compromise – worked out by House Republican Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and Senate Democrat Patty Murray of Washington -to avoid more Washington, D.C., dysfunction while trimming the deficit by $23 billion during the next decade.

Even a majority of House Republicans – including Idaho’s Mike Simpson – went along.

In the Senate, the story was different. Only because a handful of Republicans – among them John McCain of Arizona and Orrin Hatch of Utah – joined Democrats did the deal survive a filibuster attempt. Then the measure passed 64 to 36.

By opposing the deal, Crapo and Risch kept their conservative base happy. But what if their side had prevailed?

House Republicans would never have gone along with a Senate budget that boosted spending by $91 billion.

Senate Democrats would have blocked any move toward a “clean” continuing resolution locking in the so-called sequester spending cuts.

Translation: Another shutdown – and with it, more economic disruption and closed government offices.

And don’t forget, the Republican position – locking in spending at the current levels – means dropping the Payment in Lieu of Taxes program worth about $1.5 million to Idaho County. It inflicts more pain at the Idaho National Laboratory at Idaho Falls and Mountain Home Air Force Base. And for anyone working in Idaho ranching, logging or mining, it generates more delays in obtaining federal permits.

For Risch, tossing spitballs from the sidelines is just another day at the office.

But from Crapo, you expect more.

Whether it was serving on the Simpson-Bowles Commission or Senate Gang of Eight, Crapo never shirked from facing the harsh reality – any budget deal will require both spending cuts and tax increases.

That was then.

Now he’s following Risch’s example.

What a disappointment.

 

From the Post Register:

JEERS to Idaho Sens. Mike Crapo and James Risch. Here we go again. First, Risch and Crapo attempted to kill the bipartisan budget agreement before it could get a vote in the Senate. When that failed, they joined Congressman Raul Labrador and far-right Sens. Mike Lee, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul in voting against a compromise that ended hatchet-job sequestration cuts at Idaho National Laboratory and the threat of a January government shutdown.

Nobody got everything they wanted out of this deal. That’s what happens when the right and left compromise. That’s how our system works. The product that emerged from the Paul Ryan-Patty Murray negotiations was far from perfect but still good enough for 332 House members, including 169 Republicans, and 64 senators, including nine Republicans. Just not Risch. Just not Crapo.

It makes you wonder: Who are Risch and Crapo representing these days? Everyone in Idaho? Or just those who vote in the GOP primary?

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